• The Androgynous God and the Art of North India

  • 143 East State Street
  • Trenton, NJ 08608
  • Phone: (609) 599-3268
  • Presented By: Trenton Downtown Association
  • Dates: July 27, 2019
  • Location: BSB Gallery
  • Time: 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
  • Price: Free
  • Details
  • BSB Gallery is pleased to present The Androgynous God & the Art of North India presented by Peter Zirnis of The Ethnic Arts Foundation on Saturday, July 27th 1-3pm. The Ethnic Arts Foundation (EAF), is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) all volunteer organization. Founded in 1980 with the mission to encourage and support Mithila art – a centuries old women’s art form in the Mithila region of India bordering Nepal. The Androgynous God, Ardhanarishvara, is prominently featured throughout Mithila Art. Ardhanarishvara means the Lord who is half woman. It refers to the God Shiva and his wife the goddess Parvati in the form where he is the right side of the body and she the left. Shiva is one of the three main gods in the Hindu pantheon of Shiva, Vishnu and Brahma. Parvati is one of the most important female gods not because she is the wife of Shiva but because she is also most powerful in her own right as one of the principal aspects of Shakti, the Female force in the Universe. In general Hinduism can be divided into those who follow Shiva, those who follow Vishnu (especially in his avatar Krishna), and the followers of Shakti, the female force, in its aspect as a female goddess. Lecturer Peter Zirnis will discuss in detail, the importance of Ardhanarishvara throughout Mithila Art, its symbolism and ties to feminism. Zirnis was born in Latvia and raised in Brooklyn, NY, Zirnis was educated at New York University and the International Center for Photography. Teacher, computer programmer, photographer, curator, his interest in Mithila Art began with the purchase of some vibrant, energetic paintings in New Delhi some years ago. He makes yearly visits to Madhubani, advises painters, curates exhibitions, produces a blog on Mihtila artists, and assists with IT issues.

The Androgynous God and the Art of North India